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Dublin Cemetery
Dublin, Franklin County, Ohio

dublin cemetery dublin ohio
Dublin Cemetery, Dublin, OH

GPS: 40.098304, -83.117124

190 Monterey Drive
Dublin, OH 43017

Published: December 15, 2019
Total records: 4,719

Dublin Cemetery is owned by the City of Dublin, OH

Cemetery History

The cemetery is located on the south side of State Route 33/161 (Bridge Street) next to the Dublin Community Church in Historic Dublin.

Established on July 1, 1858, Dublin Cemetery was founded by the Evening Star Lodge of the International Order of Odd Fellows (I.O.O.F.). About 10 years after the institution of the Dublin chapter in 1848, as their members began to pass away, they discussed the need for a fraternal burial ground. A committee was formed to procure grounds for private burials, and when this was found to be impractical, they decided to form an association in order to open a cemetery for use by the general
public. A plot of land was purchased just west of the Christian Church (now the Dublin Community Church on Bridge Street in Old Dublin) and in July of 1858, the cemetery was opened.

The first burial was that of Mary Elizabeth Graham on Nov. 4, 1858, and many of the original members of the Odd Fellows Lodge, including
Dr. Eli Pinney, Zenas Hutchinson, and J.K. Thomas, also are buried here. A number of burials were moved from other nearby cemeteries, including Indian Run and the Deardorff Cemetery in Sharon Township.

In the 1970s, the Village of Dublin assumed responsibility of the cemetery operations, and the Dublin Cemetery was dedicated on Feb. 2, 1976.

Layout of Cemetery

The cemetery is divided into five sections.

Old Cemetery - This is the original part of the cemetery and is located on the north side of the property close to Bridge Street. Most of the stones in this section are very old and some are beginning to show signs of erosion. Many offer fine examples of the quaint epitaphs and carvings favored by the early settlers. These lots are laid out with four, fi ve or six spaces per side, divided into east and west sides.

Section 1A - The First New Addition, created by the I.O.O.F. Association when the need for burials began to overflow the Old Cemetery boundaries, is south of the Old Cemetery. The earliest burial there was in 1871, but it was used infrequently until the early 1900s. These lots are laid out with four spaces per side, divided into east and west sides.

Section 2A - The Second Addition encompasses a row of old graves along the eastern edge of the Old Cemetery (which may have been incorrectly listed as part of the Old Cemetery section when it was surveyed in 1968) as well as two and a half rows of newer graves arranged in a rectangular area between the Old Cemetery and the fence along the eastern edge of the property. These lots are laid out with four spaces per side, divided into east and west sides.

Section 3A - The Third Addition is the only section of the cemetery that contains lots available for purchase. It is a small rectangular area cut out of the southwest corner of Section 1A. The lots in this section are laid out with four spaces per side, with the east half of the lot divided into A & B, and the west half of the lot divided into C & D.

Section 4A - The Fourth Addition is located in the southwest corner of the property, from the western edge of Sections 1A and 3A to Monterey Drive. The lots in this section are laid out with four spaces per side, with the east half of the lot divided into A & B, and the west half of the lot divided into C & D.

Columbarium coming the summer of 2014.

Cemetery Records

Records below were acquired from the City of Dublin on December 15, 2019. Dates of death range from 1815 to 2019.

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