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Lorraine American Cemetery
Saint Avold, Normandy, France

lorraine american cemetery france
Lorraine American Cemetery

GPS: 49.12201, 6.71715

Avenue de Fayetteville, 57500
St. Avold, France

Published: November 1, 2019
Total records: 10,931

Lorraine American Cemetery was built and is maintained by the American Battle Monuments Commission, and sits less than one mile north of the town of St. Avold, France.

Cemetery History

The cemetery site covers 113 1/2 acres of rolling landscape on the west edge of Saar mining region. Immediately to the north and east are natural stands of oak, pine and other trees; these have been extended by a planted enframement around the northeast and south sides.

A temporary American cemetery was established on 16 March 1945 about one-half mile to the south of the present cemetery. The surrounding area was liberated by troops of the 80th Infantry Division on 27 November 1944. When Lorraine American Cemetery was built, the present site was chosen because of its superior location, prospects and aspect. It is the largest American military cemetery of WWII in Europe. Buried here are American military dead representing 41% of the burials which were originally made in this region.

Most of those interred here gave their lives during the advance to the Rhine and the advance across Germany in the Spring of 1945. Construction of the cemetery and memorial was completed in 1960.

Cemetery Records

The following records were acquired from the American Battle Monuments Commission on October 29, 2019. 500 of these records are those of soldiers whose bodies were missing, and not recovered. They are denoted in these records with the words, "Tablets of the Missing", referring to a special section of the cemetery where they have been remembered.


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